W Words For Agreement

We tried to make some plans, but we could not agree. The French word derives from the Latin compromisesum, itself related to the former compromitters (promittere means “promise”). In English, compromit was once used as a synonym for the compromised verb in its outdated sense, “to be linked by mutual agreement” and in the modern sense “to cause disability.” If you remember, concord is also synonymous with grammatical tuning. The good news is that in August, California reached an agreement with the U.S. Forest Service to intensify these efforts, with the goal of treating one million hectares per year for the next two decades. What do you mean for Concords? A. The word chords togither, in some particular accidents or qualities: as in a number, person, case, or sex. – John Brinsley, The Posing of the Parts, 1612 The compromise indicates that you are abandoning what you want in order to reach a mutual agreement (“The union and the employer have agreed to compromise”). Another meaning is to “expose yourself to suspicion, discredit or nonsense,” as in “The actor`s career has been compromised by his politically incorrect tweets” or “The editor would not compromise his principles.” And as mentioned above, it can mean risking someone or something, endangering or having serious consequences. Confidential information, national security or the immune system could be described as a “compromise.” Accord appears in ancient English with the meaning of “reconciling” or “concording,” borrowed from his Anglo-French etymon, acorder, a word akin to Latin concord, which means “consent.” This original sense of concordance is transitory, and in modern English it still occurs, but rarely.

His transitory sense of “giving or giving accordingly, whether due or deserved” – as in “The Teacher`s Students Pay Tribute to Them” – is more often encountered. “I thought we`d already agreed,” Simpson says with a little warmth. What made you want to try a deal? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible). NGLISH: The translation of the agreement for Spanish-loquettes, as a no-name and verb, began to be exchanged in English in the 14th century.

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